Family, Finished Product, Holidays

Happy Halloween 2017

 

The bewitching night is right around the corner so my day was spent finishing up the girls’ costumes for this year.  Here’s a sneak preview…

Final Try-On Before the Big Night!

Eloise wanted to be a fairy again this year.  (I made the girls fairy costumes a few years ago.)  I was going to make her a costume, but when we were out shopping for something else, we came upon a darling little costume that was in the exact color she wanted, so we purchased it.  I told her that we would do something special to make it look magical – so we added lights to the skirt of the costume.

Belen had seen a photo of her Mom (Alecia) and her Auntie Anna when they were little girls with some costumes I made for them.  She asked if she could please be a “Sack of Potatoes” like her Mom was in that picture.

I agreed that she could be a “Sack of Potatoes” but didn’t realize how hard it would be to find a potato gunny sack.  Apparently, they do not use burlap bags any more to store potatoes.  However, a friend of mine had one that she so generously offered for me to use.

After hand washing the bag, I put it on a drying rack to dry.  Next, I removed the stitching out of the bottom bag (the potato sack was printed so that the design was upside down) and pressed out any creases.

I trimmed off 2 1/2″ from the length of the bag and stitched in around 6 1/2″ from each end of the new “top” of the bag, leaving an open area for Belen’s head.  I waited for Belen to try the bag on to insure her head would fit and then stitched under a rolled hem around her neck opening.  (Note:  Because burlap has such a loose weave, I stay stitched the area I was about to cut first and then cut the burlap.  This really helped to hold it in place and keep it from unravelling.)

Belen was so tickled with her finished Potato Sack costume – she just beamed!

After a second Belen try-on to properly place her arm holes, I removed stitching from one side seam to create her first arm hole.  Next, I cut a hole on the opposite side for her second arm – this one was faced with a piece of linen remnant.

Her circle of potatoes that ringed her neck were created by stuffing the leg of a pair of panty hose and then stitching here and there to create the dimpling.

I used the same technique for her matching potato barrettes.  It was fun to see her reaction when she did the final try-on.

 

Eloise was thrilled with her illuminated fairy costume

For Eloise’s costume, I made a small quilted bag to hold the battery pack for the lights.  I put a sleeve on it and slid it onto a small belt.  This held the battery pack for her skirt in place.

Next, I sewed a buttonhole through a couple layers of the netting of the skirt to provide an opening for the string of lights.  I gently pulled the lights through the buttonhole and pinned them in place, while Eloise was trying on her outfit.

Finally, I carefully safety pinned the string of lights in place – and once they were turned on, they were quite the spectacle.  The lights were already woven into a shear mesh, which made them a lot easier to attach.

Eloise was equally excited when put on her finished costume, as you can see.

The girls are all ready for Halloween and were very excited to show their Mom and Dad their finished costumes.

Have you been doing some Halloween sewing as well?  If so, I would love to hear about it.  Wishing you an early “Happy Halloween”!

Happy Stitching!

Jane

Finished Product

Sew Much Fun at College of Idaho

My Beginner Strip Quilting Class members
My Beginner Strip Quilting Class members – Elaine, Lindsey, myself, Letitia and her daughter, Anne, Stacey and her Mom, Suzi

It’s hard to believe that we have completed our first ever quilting class at College of Idaho. It was so much fun and I had a great group of delightful ladies who completed their quilt tops with much enthusiasm.

Stacey working on strip placement
Stacey working on strip placement
Anne auditioning her layout
Anne auditioning her layout

It was so much fun to work with everyone as they constructed their strip quilts.  For some, it was their very first time ever at a sewing machine and for others, it had just been awhile since they had worked on a sewing project.  Irregardless, they all were so excited to be there working together towards a common goal.  The majority of the quilts were made as gifts for other people, which was very special indeed.

Letitia and her daughter, Anne, reviewing Letitia's quilt top layout
Letitia and her daughter, Anne, reviewing Letitia’s quilt top layout
Suzanne's (Stacey's Mom) completed quilt top
Suzanne’s (Stacey’s Mom) completed quilt top

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were 2 mother/daughter teams who worked on quilts together.  It was fun to watch them share ideas and opinions as their tops evolved.

Demonstrating how to miter a corner
Demonstrating how to miter a corner
Sharing ways to join the ends of the binding
Sharing ways to join the ends of the binding

 

 

 

 

 

 

We spent a lot of time reviewing the fundamentals of quilt making and during the final class the students created their own custom binding and learned how to bind a quilt with mitered corners.

Letitia and Stacey
Letitia and Stacey
Elaine working on her lovely lap quilt
Elaine working on her lovely lap quilt

 

There was also plenty of time to visit and get to know one another.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As well as time to be creative and explore new ideas…

 

 

 

 

 

For the last class, the College of Idaho Newsletter asked to visit the class and interview some of the students.  We were asked to wear our purple t-shirts.  Justine Daime, a staff photographer, took several photos and some of them are included in this blog post (Thanks, Justine).  If you would like to read the newsletter article, you can do so at this link to the College of Idaho Newsletter.

Posing for the Photographer
Posing for the Photographer

The class was also proud to share their completed quilt tops as you can see below…

Letitia and her daughter, Anne.
Letitia and her daughter, Anne.
Stacey, Letitia and Lindsey with their lovely tops
Stacey, Letitia and Lindsey with their lovely tops

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This pattern is so much fun to make because each and every quilt has its own personality.  Letitia and Lindsey even began the class using the same jelly rolls, but their quilt tops were very unique because of their unique layouts and choices for borders and bindings.

Me with my original class sample completed quilt
Me with my original class sample completed quilt
Suzi having a good time!
Suzi having a good time!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The room and facilities at the College of Idaho were wonderful.  We had lots of space to work on our projects and enjoyed the incredible light in the Shannon Library.  It really was a wonderful class and best of all, everyone seemed to have a genuinely good time.

I am so very proud of my students’ accomplishments and really enjoyed working with each and every one of them.  It was a privilege to have this opportunity and I’m looking forward to my next paper piecing class that begins next Monday, July 20th.  If you would like more information about this class, you can read more about it at the Summer Program page.

I hope you are enjoying your summer and would love to hear about any sewing projects you have been working on.

Happy Sewing!

Jane

Finished Product

The Princess and the Pea for Eloise

 

Eloise's Princess and the Pea Quilt
Eloise’s Princess and the Pea Quilt

I designed a special quilt for our granddaughter, Eloise.  At the same time, I developed a pattern for this quilt as you may recall in an earlier blog, introducing the Princess and the Pea pattern.

After I made the original sample for the pattern, I created another one, just for Eloise.  I changed the second quilt and used a variation suggested in the pattern.  Instead of bias trim for the vine that winds around the quilt’s border, I used a large rickrack.

I’m very pleased to share that last night I gave Eloise her quilt and she was delighted and could not wait to put it on her bed.  The first thing she wanted to do, of course, was to find the pea!

Eloise with her Princess and the Pea quilt
Eloise with her Princess and the Pea quilt
Eloise pointing out the pea
Eloise pointing out the pea

For the last several weeks, whenever we were together, she would ask about the status of her quilt.

I was committed to finishing this quilt as it was made especially for her and had some unique features.  First of all, her mommy, Alecia, had asked me to make the quilt using fabric with the 1930’s vintage look.  I also had to incorporate Eloise’s favorite color, purple and began collecting fabrics and rummaged through my stash to come up with a good collection for her quilt.  I also used rickrack for the vine that twists around the border of the quilt.  I love the bit of whimsy that this added to the quilt.  I found a darling background print with little purple flowers that served as the perfect backdrop for the princess’ bed.  It was so much fun to see this quilt come together and watch as the anticipation built from Eloise.

She was particularly tickled when I added the crown with her name on it and she loved to search for the little pea under the bottom mattress when the quilt was on my design wall.

The crown for Miss Eloise
The crown for Miss Eloise
The pea peeking out under the bottom mattress
The pea peeking out under the bottom mattress

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the top was finished, I had it quilted by Yvette Ebaugh, who did an incredible job on my original Princess and the Pea quilt.  Once again, she did a beautiful job as you can see in the following pictures…

The beautiful quilting truly highlighted the quilt
The beautiful quilting truly highlighted the quilt
Love how the woodgrain was quilted on the bedposts
Love how the woodgrain was quilted on the bedposts

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each mattress was quilted different
Each mattress was quilted different

 

 

 

I love how the quilting highlighted the pea
I love how the quilting highlighted the pea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, I made the label for Eloise’s quilt.  I always consider this the finishing touch for a quilt because it tells a bit of a story of the quilt, as in who it was made for and when, etc.

Sweet Eloise's quilt label
Sweet Eloise’s quilt label

I’m so pleased to have this quilt finished and tickled that Eloise loves it.  That’s what really makes it all worthwhile.

What quilt projects have you been working on?  I would love to hear about them.

Happy Sewing!

Jane

Note:  If you would like to make your own Princess and the Pea quilt, it is available as a pattern that can be purchased locally at the Quilt Crossing or online at Craftsy.

 

 

Finished Product

Fun Sun Hats for Children

This spring, I was surprised when an innocent-looking mole I had turned out to be a basal cell carcinoma.  It was a reminder of how important it is to protect ourselves from the sun.  Wearing a sun hat is one way to do this, along with sun screen, etc.  I thought that by personalizing and making hats for children from fabrics and colors they liked, they would be more inclined to wear them.  The result was sun hats for both Belén and Eloise.  After doing some research for a suitable pattern, I came across a great book entitled Children’s Sun Hats that contains 20 different projects for hats for lots of different occasions.

Children's Sun Hats book
Children’s Sun Hats book

Apparently, the author, Gill Stratton, has always loved hats and attended the London School of Fashion to learn how to make hats.  The book is well written with clear instructions and fun and innovative ideas.

The girls picked out their fabrics.  Belen chose two coordinating prints in brown and pink and Eloise chose two prints with her favorite color… PURPLE!  Here she is modeling her new sun hat.

Eloise's Sun Hat
Eloise’s Sun Hat
Eloise in her sun hat
Eloise in her sun hat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And, of course, I had to also make a hat for her big sister, Belén, as well.  Belén spent quite a bit of time choosing a variety of buttons to adorn her new sun hat.

Inside Belén's Sun Hat
Inside Belén’s Sun Hat
Belén's Sun Hat
Belén’s Sun Hat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was so much fun that I decided to make a few more hats, including…

Baseball cap, Strawberry Sun Hat and Belén's Hat
Baseball cap, Strawberry Sun Hat and Belén’s Hat
Inside Baseball Cap (called Bicycle Hat in book)
Inside Baseball Cap (called Bicycle Hat in book)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would like to learn how to make a sun hat, I will also be teaching  classes on how to make Sun Hats at the Quilt Crossing (see page 8 of the newsletter for more details).   The class is called Sun Hats for Boys and Girls and the next class is scheduled for Monday, July 21, from 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Belén modeling her sun hat
Belén modeling her sun hat

 

These hats are very versatile and fun to personalize and they also provide good protection from the sun for children.  Of course, with a few minor adjustments in size, they can also be worn by adults.

I hope you are enjoying this beautiful time of year.

Happy Sewing!

Jane

Finished Product

Liam Learns to Quilt

Liam holding his almost- finished quilt
Liam holding his almost- finished quilt

The past several weeks have been a flurry of activity.  I have had the privilege to not only teach a number of classes, but also to take several classes, which I will tell you more about in future blogs.

I was also asked by someone if I would be interested in teaching her 8 year old son, Liam, how to quilt.  Upon meeting Liam, there was no question about the fact that he genuinely wanted to make a quilt for his stuffed animals.  After I discussed potential projects, Liam, his Mom, Valerie, and I agreed upon a smaller quilt project that would be made from my pattern, B’s Big Girl Quilt.

Liam checking the fabrics he chose for his quilt
Liam checking the fabrics he chose for his quilt

Later in the week, Liam and Valerie met me at the Quilt Crossing where Liam carefully chose the fabrics he wanted to include in his quilt.  He had very definite ideas about the colors, designs and was already sharing how he thought it should be quilted.  This made for a very exciting afternoon and when he left, he had his fabric strips and borders ready for his first quilting class.

When Liam arrived for his first lesson, I initially spent quite a bit of time showing him how a sewing machine works as well as how to safely operate it.  He was fascinated and asked a lot of good questions.  Next, we used a design wall to lay out his fabric strips.  This is a great way to audition the various colored strips to insure you achieve the look you want before you begin to sew the strips together.  Then we sewed the strips together.

Liam and I adding numbers to the strips to keep them organized.
Liam and I adding numbers to the strips to keep them organized.
Liam proud of his first day's work
Liam proud of his first day’s work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liam carefully folded the individual strips to mark each strip’s center with a pin and then we matched the pins and began to sew the strips together.  This took a real team effort as Liam was not tall enough to reach the foot pedal.  So, he would push the pedal with his foot, while together we guided the fabric under the presser foot.  We were quite a team!

Liam pinning the centers of the fabric strips
Liam pinning the centers of the fabric strips
Liam passing me a pinned strip
Liam passing me a pinned strip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valerie was always there to cheer us on and Liam genuinely enjoyed showing her what he was accomplishing.  Before long, we had the center section of the quilt sewn together.

Liam sharing with Valerie his final quilt preview/layout
Liam sharing with Valerie his final quilt preview/layout
Liam was not as excited about his homework
Liam was not as excited about his homework

We also had workbooks for Liam to read as well as exercises for him to complete between our weekly lessons.  One week we focused on the different parts of the sewing machine, safety measures to follow when sewing, etc.  Liam was not as excited about his homework as he was about the actual sewing each week.

During our next sewing session, we worked on the inside and then outside borders.  We had great rhythm and teamwork on our sewing.  Valerie captured Liam’s “pedal to the metal” in a photo while I was guiding the fabric through the presser foot above.

Liam's foot on the foot pedal of the sewing machine.
Liam’s foot on the foot pedal of the sewing machine.
Inside border is complete!
Inside border is complete!

It was  exciting to see the quilt come together, step by step.  It wasn’t long before we had completed the quilt top.  Liam was tickled to show off his completed quilt top!  Next, we prepared the quilt back that Liam chose and layered the quilt top, batting and backing and pinned in place.

Liam with his completed quilt top
Liam with his completed quilt top
Layering the backing, batting and quilt top and pinning in place
Layering the backing, batting and quilt top and pinning in place

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We brainstormed how Liam would like the quilting and he agreed it was okay for me to work on this between lessons.  It was helpful because I had no doubt how he wanted me to quilt it.  He asked for swirls and spirals and also specified that he would like a leaf quilted on it.  In addition, he would like to have his name in the quilting instead of a separate label on the back of the quilt.  Here’s what I did…

Another "Liam" amongst the quilting
Another “Liam” amongst the quilting
Look closely to find a leaf on this corner of the border
Look closely to find a leaf on this corner of the border
One of several spirals
One of several spirals
Liam's name amongst the quilting - it was on all 4 sides of the outside border.
Liam’s name amongst the quilting – it was on all 4 sides of the outside border.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liam was very excited to see the quilting I had completed and was quick to find all the items he had requested.  During his final class, we attached the outside binding by machine and, “TA DA!”  His quilt was complete!  Congratulations, Liam!  The most rewarding thing of all is that he is already talking about his next sewing project!

This was his initial reaction...
This was his initial reaction…
Followed by this...  Congratulations, Liam, on a job well done!
Followed by this… Congratulations, Liam, on a job well done!
Finished Product

Sweet Eloise has arrived!!!

We are delighted to share that our new granddaughter, Eloise Mae Hoobing, was born on May 1 at 4:45 a.m.,  weighing 7 lbs., 12 oz. and measuring 21 3/4 inches.   We are so thankful that mother and granddaughter are both doing great!

Alecia and Eloise

While Mom, Dad and new baby were at the hospital, we had the pleasure of watching the newborn’s big sister, Belén, who turned two just last Thursday.  She was an absolutely delightful little house guest.  She seemed a bit uncertain about the new member of the family when we visited the hospital, but after a couple visits, I think she began to understand that her baby sister was now a part of the family. 

Belén and Daddy with Eloise

Yesterday, Belén and I decided to make a boppy pillow cover for her new baby sister.  The boppy pillow that Alecia had was covered with a cotton cover.  We thought it would be nice to have a softer minkee cover for Baby Eloise to lay on.  

In April, Alecia found a boppy cover pattern at a blog called Vanilla Joy.  I used the pattern (pieces 1-6), but instead of putting a zipper on the backside of the cover, as the author instructed, I put the zipper on the outside seam line.  I cut two identical pieces for the front and back side of the boppy cover and then put a 22″ zipper in the center of the back seamline.  This enables you to use both sides of the pillow cover to lay the baby on for support. 

Once I taped the pieces together, I cut two identical pieces for front and back of the cover.

Here’s a link to the Vanilla Joy blog that provides the pattern and more details on how to make the cover, with a zipper on the back side.  We appreciate the use of the pattern and great instructions.  You can decide which position you prefer to have the zipper in and plan accordingly.

The boppy pillow with the new minkee cover

Above is a picture of the completed cover and two very special people who will be using it. 

Happy sewing!

Finished Product

Fiji Wedding Quilt for Anna Marie

One of my favorite aspects of quilting is being able to make something special and relevant for those you love.   Our youngest daughter, Anna Marie, always dreamed of being married barefoot on a beach.  In February of 2009, that wish came true…

Anna and Derik saying vows on beach in Fiji

We had a wonderful stay in Fiji, and while we were there, I was impressed with all the beautiful colorful fabrics the natives wore.  This inspired me to make a batik wedding quilt for Anna and Derik.

My first step was to gather the batiks I had collected and determine a pattern to use for the quilt.  

Batiks for Anna's wedding quilt

I based my quilt on a pattern by Blue Underground called Mod Quads.  Since it only measured 40″ x 60″, I enlarged the pattern and created my own template for this quilt in my Electric Quilt software.

Each block had at least two fabrics and I wanted to make it appear that the color of one block bled into the adjacent block.  In order to insure an accurate color match, I scanned each batik fabric and imported these  fabric scans into my Electric Quilt Software.  This enaabled me to “paint” that scan into the final template I created for the quilt as you can see in the following picture. 

Template I created in Electric Quilt with scanned fabric

The EQ Template I created became a valuable guide for me as I began to construct the quilt.  Since I ended up with over 60 different batiks, it was important to organize my fabric pieces so I could begin to build the blocks, insuring I was pairing up the correct colors and pieces in order to achieve the final look I wanted.

Sample of block combinations that would be used

As I began to cut the strips and pieces, I laid them out in pairs…

Matching up the different pieces for each block

Next, it was time to stitch each of the blocks.  I used a method called chain piecing.  In order to chain piece, stitch your first seam together and before you sew to the very end, line up the next pieces you want to stitch.  Put these pieces right next to the current block you are stitching and when you finish stitching the first block, continue to sew right into the next block, without trimming the threads and thus, forming a chain. 

Chain Piecing the blocks together

 It was very important to press each seam as I built the blocks.  Then it was time to begin to lay out the blocks. 

Starting to layout the blocks

It was exciting to see the design build and finally come together.  I used a portable flannel design board to help keep the blocks in place as I laid them out.  It took a while to finish the final layout and then I was ready to join the rows of blocks together to complete the first stage of the quilt top.

Laying out the final blocks on the flannel board

Once the top was stitched together, I sewed together the back of the quilt.

The finished pieced back of the quilt

When I make a large quilt, I usually hire it out to be quilted as it is challenging to manipulate so much fabric on a regular size machine.  The machine quilter who has quilted both of our daughters’ wedding quilts is Ingrid Martin of Baywater Quilting (#208-455-7516).  When you put so much love and effort into a quilt, you want to insure it is in good hands.  Ingrid does amazing work. 

It’s important to share with the machine quilter what your vision is for your finished quilt.  In my case, I told her I wanted to capture the essence of Anna and Derik’s Fiji wedding.  She understood and we agreed upon a free motion quilting pattern where she would combine waves and fire, reminiscent of the waves of the ocean and the celebratory bonfire on the beach the evening of the wedding.  As I mentioned, Ingrid had also quilted Alecia and Andy’s wedding quilt and did a beautiful job (I’ll share in a future blog), so I was pleased to have her work on Anna’s as well. 

Ingrid Martin, Machine Quilter/Artist

Once Ingrid had completed the quilting, my next step was to finish off the binding on the quilt.  I felt that it was important to contain the movement and bright colors of the quilt.  One way I thought I could accomplish this was to add some batik piping in a bright color to the edge of the quilt, prior to attaching the binding. 

Making gold batik piping to put on the quilt

Once the piping was made, then it was time to stitch it onto the quilt.

Stitching the piping onto the quilt

And then, the final step of adding the outside red binding, first with the machine…

Checking stitching on outside binding

And then by hand…

Stitching on the outside binding by hand

And, now the best part, giving the quilt to our daughter, Anna Marie, and her wonderful husband, Derik…

Anna and Derik receiving their quilt

And seeing the smile on their faces… made it all worthwhile! 

I think she likes it...
Finished Product

In Memory of Mom

In February, 2006, I lost my sweet mother, Hazel Margaret Johnson, to lymphoma.  It was a particularly gloomy,  cold February in Fargo, ND, where she had lived for several years.  I’m sure it seemed even more so because of what I was dealing with at the time, the difficult realization that I was losing her and to witness her gradual failure.   
My mother was a wonderful person.  She was gracious and always showed an interest in people.  She was a fun Mom and had a great disposition.  She was an excellent cook and a casual housekeeper, as one would have to be with 6 children.  She also worked part-time as a registered nurse, which suited her well as she was kind and compassionate.   She took great pride in her immaculate white nurse’s uniform and crisp white starched cap.   I loved to watch her get ready for work. 
Mom loved people and you could always count on a hot cup of coffee (or two), some delicious sweet treats and great conversation when you visited Hazel and Ralph.  Drop in’s were always welcome.  She had a fun sense of humor and could be quite a character, especially when she teamed up with her identical twin sister, my Aunt Helen. 
Mom and Helen as babies - this was a wall hanging I made for each of them for their 80th birthday.
I have so many fond childhood memories of the fun we had with them when we were back on the farm visiting my grandparents and aunts and uncles, and my bizillion cousins.  I could write a book about the adventures from those days.  Mom seemed to be her happiest when she was around her family and I know that is why she and Dad moved back to North Dakota after my father retired.   It really was where she was most at home.  She also shared a very close bond with her twin.  I remember when we were living several thousand miles (and states) away from Helen, Mom could still sense when Helen needed her support and vice versa. 
Mom (left) and her twin, Helen. at the train station
Mom loved to talk about growing up on the farm, which my Grandpa Sveen homesteaded in Edinburg, ND.  (It is still in the family and currently farmed by my cousin, Danny.)  She and her twin and their two brothers cross country skied to school;  and many years later, that same school house became a wonderful home for my grandparents for their retirement years.  My grandfather was an amazing carpenter and purchased the old schoolhouse building and converted it into a charming home.    Both my grandparents were Norwegian, and that was the language used at home, until the children started school.    Unfortunately, Mom did not teach us Norwegian, but instead used it as a means to discuss something she didn’t want us to know about.  

My sisters Mary and Vicki, my brother, Mark, and me on top of the clothesline at Grandma's house, with our cousins' farm dogs. Hmm, not exactly the safest exercise.
Every summer, my grandparents would invite a pair of us (there were 6 children in my family) to come stay with them for a couple weeks.  We would spend the majority of the time playing with our cousins, exploring down by the river, building forts in the hay lofts, getting the cows in the pasture for milking,  and “helping” in the kitchen.   My Grandma Sveen (Magadelena)  was an excellent seamstress.  Occasionally, she would teach us how to sew and embroider. ( She really nurtured my interest in sewing and taught me how to quilt when I was an adult.)   Of course, there is no place like North Dakota to experience a  real summer thunderstorm and pray a tornado isn’t part of it.   We had a pretty free rein as long as we didn’t get in the way of the hired men and/or our uncles who were busy farming.  I loved those summer days and being on the farm…  and remember all too well all the mischief we got into (but that is another chapter…).  It helped me to understand why Mom always seemed to long for her roots in ND.  
Candid pic of Mom's family - My uncle Nick, Aunt Helen, Grandpa, Mom, Grandpa and my uncle, Ernest
It was from these childhood experiences and wonderful stories and memories that Mom shared with me that an idea culminated.  After she passed away, there was a huge void in my life, that only she could fill.  It was a very difficult time for me and my siblings.  In time, I started to replace that sense of loss with an appreciation and recollection of all the wonderful traditions and memories she gave me.  One day, while I was purchasing some thread at a quilt store, I came across a set of panels that depicted children on a farm, about the same time and generation of Mom and Helen.  Some of the scenes were so reminiscent of the stories she told like gathering the eggs from the hens and getting chased by a rooster, etc.  In addition, there was a collection of fabric that had many of the colors Mom enjoyed and it was designed from American Jane by Moda.  All of this spoke to me and I felt it all came together  for one purpose, to make a quilt for Mom.    
A tribute to Mom
A Tribute to Mom

 I began to lay out the blocks, modifying a pattern of a smaller quilt I saw earlier at the Country Quilter.  Gradually the blocks fell into place and the quilt began to come to life.   The panels were so charming and made me smile.  Here are a few… 

Some of the farm scenes on the quilt

It was very comforting to be making this as a sort of tribute to Mom.  I found it a very rewarding project as I really felt like Mom would have loved this quilt.

The quilt label

 Once finished, the quilt found a home in our guest bedroom and I smile every time I see it.  

The finished quilt

I look forward to when I can tell our grandchildren the story behind it and what a wonderful person their Great Grandma Hazel was and how she loved life on the farm.

Mom and Me in 2005