Finished Product

Fun Sun Hats for Children

This spring, I was surprised when an innocent-looking mole I had turned out to be a basal cell carcinoma.  It was a reminder of how important it is to protect ourselves from the sun.  Wearing a sun hat is one way to do this, along with sun screen, etc.  I thought that by personalizing and making hats for children from fabrics and colors they liked, they would be more inclined to wear them.  The result was sun hats for both Belén and Eloise.  After doing some research for a suitable pattern, I came across a great book entitled Children’s Sun Hats that contains 20 different projects for hats for lots of different occasions.

Children's Sun Hats book
Children’s Sun Hats book

Apparently, the author, Gill Stratton, has always loved hats and attended the London School of Fashion to learn how to make hats.  The book is well written with clear instructions and fun and innovative ideas.

The girls picked out their fabrics.  Belen chose two coordinating prints in brown and pink and Eloise chose two prints with her favorite color… PURPLE!  Here she is modeling her new sun hat.

Eloise's Sun Hat
Eloise’s Sun Hat
Eloise in her sun hat
Eloise in her sun hat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And, of course, I had to also make a hat for her big sister, Belén, as well.  Belén spent quite a bit of time choosing a variety of buttons to adorn her new sun hat.

Inside Belén's Sun Hat
Inside Belén’s Sun Hat
Belén's Sun Hat
Belén’s Sun Hat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was so much fun that I decided to make a few more hats, including…

Baseball cap, Strawberry Sun Hat and Belén's Hat
Baseball cap, Strawberry Sun Hat and Belén’s Hat
Inside Baseball Cap (called Bicycle Hat in book)
Inside Baseball Cap (called Bicycle Hat in book)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would like to learn how to make a sun hat, I will also be teaching  classes on how to make Sun Hats at the Quilt Crossing (see page 8 of the newsletter for more details).   The class is called Sun Hats for Boys and Girls and the next class is scheduled for Monday, July 21, from 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Belén modeling her sun hat
Belén modeling her sun hat

 

These hats are very versatile and fun to personalize and they also provide good protection from the sun for children.  Of course, with a few minor adjustments in size, they can also be worn by adults.

I hope you are enjoying this beautiful time of year.

Happy Sewing!

Jane

Finished Product

Liam Learns to Quilt

Liam holding his almost- finished quilt
Liam holding his almost- finished quilt

The past several weeks have been a flurry of activity.  I have had the privilege to not only teach a number of classes, but also to take several classes, which I will tell you more about in future blogs.

I was also asked by someone if I would be interested in teaching her 8 year old son, Liam, how to quilt.  Upon meeting Liam, there was no question about the fact that he genuinely wanted to make a quilt for his stuffed animals.  After I discussed potential projects, Liam, his Mom, Valerie, and I agreed upon a smaller quilt project that would be made from my pattern, B’s Big Girl Quilt.

Liam checking the fabrics he chose for his quilt
Liam checking the fabrics he chose for his quilt

Later in the week, Liam and Valerie met me at the Quilt Crossing where Liam carefully chose the fabrics he wanted to include in his quilt.  He had very definite ideas about the colors, designs and was already sharing how he thought it should be quilted.  This made for a very exciting afternoon and when he left, he had his fabric strips and borders ready for his first quilting class.

When Liam arrived for his first lesson, I initially spent quite a bit of time showing him how a sewing machine works as well as how to safely operate it.  He was fascinated and asked a lot of good questions.  Next, we used a design wall to lay out his fabric strips.  This is a great way to audition the various colored strips to insure you achieve the look you want before you begin to sew the strips together.  Then we sewed the strips together.

Liam and I adding numbers to the strips to keep them organized.
Liam and I adding numbers to the strips to keep them organized.
Liam proud of his first day's work
Liam proud of his first day’s work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liam carefully folded the individual strips to mark each strip’s center with a pin and then we matched the pins and began to sew the strips together.  This took a real team effort as Liam was not tall enough to reach the foot pedal.  So, he would push the pedal with his foot, while together we guided the fabric under the presser foot.  We were quite a team!

Liam pinning the centers of the fabric strips
Liam pinning the centers of the fabric strips
Liam passing me a pinned strip
Liam passing me a pinned strip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Valerie was always there to cheer us on and Liam genuinely enjoyed showing her what he was accomplishing.  Before long, we had the center section of the quilt sewn together.

Liam sharing with Valerie his final quilt preview/layout
Liam sharing with Valerie his final quilt preview/layout
Liam was not as excited about his homework
Liam was not as excited about his homework

We also had workbooks for Liam to read as well as exercises for him to complete between our weekly lessons.  One week we focused on the different parts of the sewing machine, safety measures to follow when sewing, etc.  Liam was not as excited about his homework as he was about the actual sewing each week.

During our next sewing session, we worked on the inside and then outside borders.  We had great rhythm and teamwork on our sewing.  Valerie captured Liam’s “pedal to the metal” in a photo while I was guiding the fabric through the presser foot above.

Liam's foot on the foot pedal of the sewing machine.
Liam’s foot on the foot pedal of the sewing machine.
Inside border is complete!
Inside border is complete!

It was  exciting to see the quilt come together, step by step.  It wasn’t long before we had completed the quilt top.  Liam was tickled to show off his completed quilt top!  Next, we prepared the quilt back that Liam chose and layered the quilt top, batting and backing and pinned in place.

Liam with his completed quilt top
Liam with his completed quilt top
Layering the backing, batting and quilt top and pinning in place
Layering the backing, batting and quilt top and pinning in place

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We brainstormed how Liam would like the quilting and he agreed it was okay for me to work on this between lessons.  It was helpful because I had no doubt how he wanted me to quilt it.  He asked for swirls and spirals and also specified that he would like a leaf quilted on it.  In addition, he would like to have his name in the quilting instead of a separate label on the back of the quilt.  Here’s what I did…

Another "Liam" amongst the quilting
Another “Liam” amongst the quilting
Look closely to find a leaf on this corner of the border
Look closely to find a leaf on this corner of the border
One of several spirals
One of several spirals
Liam's name amongst the quilting - it was on all 4 sides of the outside border.
Liam’s name amongst the quilting – it was on all 4 sides of the outside border.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liam was very excited to see the quilting I had completed and was quick to find all the items he had requested.  During his final class, we attached the outside binding by machine and, “TA DA!”  His quilt was complete!  Congratulations, Liam!  The most rewarding thing of all is that he is already talking about his next sewing project!

This was his initial reaction...
This was his initial reaction…
Followed by this...  Congratulations, Liam, on a job well done!
Followed by this… Congratulations, Liam, on a job well done!
Finished Product

New Pattern – Insulated Bowl Holders

Note:  This pattern was originally called the Microwave Bowl Holder, but has been changed to the “Insulated Bowl Holder”.  It is the same pattern, the only change is the name and the suggestion to not cook food with it in the microwave to avoid any risk of fire.  Instead carefully slip the hot bowl into the holder to protect your hands.  These are also very popular to hold cold dishes as well.  Enjoy!

Here’s the original blog that refers to the Microwave Bowl Holders…

No more burned fingers from hot bowls in your microwave!!!

Small Microwave Bowl Holder
Small Microwave Bowl Holder

I am pleased to announce my latest pattern – a pattern for Microwave Bowl Holders.  No more burned fingers from hot bowls in the microwave!  They also work great to insulate your hands from a cold dish of ice cream.

It is a fun pattern to make and instructions are included for 3 sizes:  Small (fits average size cereal bowl), Medium (fits large soup bowl); and Large (fits 9-10″ bowl).

All 3 sizes stacked together
All 3 sizes stacked together

They stack and store easily and are very handy in the kitchen.

IMG_9069 - Small
3 Sizes of bowl holders stacked together

The pattern includes detailed instructions and illustrations that guide you through easy construction.  You can make one from a fat quarter of fabric or several from a yard.  You’ll be amazed at how quickly these holders come together and find yourself making several for yourself as well as family friends.  And…. they are a GREAT gift idea!!!

Large bowl holder
Large bowl holder

In addition, they are easy to personalize, based on your fabric selections, and are reversible!

Pattern for Microwave Bowl Holders

One of my customers told me that she uses one every night to hold her cold dish of ice cream – another great idea!

The pattern is available online at Craftsy as well as locally, here in Boise, at the Quilt Crossing.

Last but not least, they would also be a wonderful hostess gift during the holidays.

I hope you will try them out and, if you do, share some photos of your completed holders as I love to see completed projects from my patterns.

Hope you are enjoying this “BLACK FRIDAY”…

Happy Sewing!

 

Jane

Bias Trim, Finished Product, Gift Idea, Kitchen Accessories, New Patterns, Serger Option

New Pattern for Cake and Casserole Carrier with Potholders

Casserole Carrier with Potholders and outer spoon pocket
Fresh off the press!!!  I’m excited to share my new pattern for a very handy item – a cake and casserole carrier.     I made one for myself many years ago and after numerous requests, have recently made it into a pattern to share with others.
This view shows the inner pocket and lining

It is an easy to make pattern for a very practical item. If you make this for yourself, you will discover that this carrier will be one of your favorite items to use to transport hot dishes or cakes to your next picnic or social event.

The pattern includes 2 versions of the carrier and potholders.  Instructions are included for 2 types of edge finishes, a bias trim edge as shown in the previous pictures and a serged edge finish as shown below.
A carrier with a serged edge finish and inside spoon pocket
 It’s also a great gift idea that will be used over and over again.   This pattern will quickly become one of your favorites and if you can’t find a pre-quilted fabric in the kitchen colors you want, you can simply make your own quilted fabric to use.  What a great way to practice your free motion quilting.
Don’t forget the pair of matching potholders…

This is also a great project to use a binder attachment, if you have one for your machine.  I was able to make the models you see in the pictures using Bernina’s Binder Attachment #88 and it worked great.The pattern is currently available at Etsy and is also available locally in Boise at the Quilt Crossing.

I will be teaching a class using this pattern on Tuesday, June 12th at the Quilt Crossing, which should be a lot of fun.  I need to caution you, this pattern can be addictive! Happy Sewing…Jane